cantpronounce:

theconsultingvillain:

Sherlock + curious silence whenever people form assumptions about him and john as a couple

because he doesn’t want to say no but he can’t say yes

renakat11:

pastycake:

uhttractive:

twerkjakeiscanon:

shattered—colors:

gifs-for-fun:

I installed it without directions…

I don’t know why I’m laughing so hard


oh my god same

put different colored lightbulbs and youve got yourself a fun time

can you post how to install it this way?

renakat11:

pastycake:

uhttractive:

twerkjakeiscanon:

shattered—colors:

gifs-for-fun:

I installed it without directions…

I don’t know why I’m laughing so hard

oh my god same

put different colored lightbulbs and youve got yourself a fun time

can you post how to install it this way?

auburnrecluse:

I will never get over how young and adorable they both look in this readthrough. They look like college students who just woke for an early lecture.

ramesesniblickthethird:

Perfectly in sync. 

julianaegley:

thefutureisbroken:

mother—mortis:

Can we just.

Always reblog.

ramesesniblickthethird:

The mind boggles, but I think this passes for holding hands.

ramesesniblickthethird:

The mind boggles, but I think this passes for holding hands.

ri-science:

Today is Ada Lovelace Day, celebrating women in STEM
Ada Lovelace is widely held to have been the first computer programmer. Close friends with inventor Charles Babbage, she was intrigued by his Analytical Engine and in 1842 translated a description of it by Italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea. Babbage asked her to expand the article, “as she understood [it] so well”, and this was when she wrote several early ‘computer programs’ a 100 years before the first computers were built. 
Ada Lovelace Day is an international day of celebration helping people learn about the achievements of women in STEM, inspiring others and creating new role models for young and old alike.
Ada herself was an inspiration to many including Michael Faraday.
On the 10 June 1840, Ada Lovelace sent a copy of her portrait to Michael Faraday with a note saying

'Dear Mr. Faraday,
Mr Babbage tells me that you have expressed a wish to possess one of the engravings of me, by which I feel exceedingly flattered, & hope you will accept one that we still happen to have by us.
I am sorry that there is no proof left, to which I might have put my signature.
 Believe me, yours very truly
 Augusta Ada Lovelace
 St James’ Square

Faraday liked to collect images of people he met or were acquainted with so this etching was gratefully received into his collection. 
This was the start of a friendship and admiration which lasted till until Ada’s death in 1852 at the age of 36.

ri-science:

Today is Ada Lovelace Day, celebrating women in STEM

Ada Lovelace is widely held to have been the first computer programmer. Close friends with inventor Charles Babbage, she was intrigued by his Analytical Engine and in 1842 translated a description of it by Italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea. Babbage asked her to expand the article, “as she understood [it] so well”, and this was when she wrote several early ‘computer programs’ a 100 years before the first computers were built. 

Ada Lovelace Day is an international day of celebration helping people learn about the achievements of women in STEM, inspiring others and creating new role models for young and old alike.

Ada herself was an inspiration to many including Michael Faraday.

On the 10 June 1840, Ada Lovelace sent a copy of her portrait to Michael Faraday with a note saying

'Dear Mr. Faraday,

Mr Babbage tells me that you have expressed a wish to possess one of the engravings of me, by which I feel exceedingly flattered, & hope you will accept one that we still happen to have by us.

I am sorry that there is no proof left, to which I might have put my signature.

 Believe me, yours very truly

 Augusta Ada Lovelace

 St James’ Square

Faraday liked to collect images of people he met or were acquainted with so this etching was gratefully received into his collection.

This was the start of a friendship and admiration which lasted till until Ada’s death in 1852 at the age of 36.

lamardeuse:

Caps from Lewis 801: Entry Wounds. Everyone looks so adorable, as usual, and the looks between the boys - sigh.

Also, I cannot fucking believe that is how English people think you build a canoe.

britishdetectives:

Robbie, it is my understanding that your dinner is being served in a canoe this evening.

lamardeuse:

So I might have met Kevin Whately last night and gave him books from Nova Scotia authors to read with his granddaughter to thank him for being awesome. And he might have touched my arm and thanked me and said other things - we talked briefly about Canada and a couple of other things, but it was a…

;-)

gabrielediwald:

Radschatten

ancientart:

A brief cross-cultural look at necklaces from the ancient world.

The first is made of green jadeite, from Chiapas in Mexico, and likely of the Maya culture. AD 200-900.

Second is an Egyptian necklace from the Late-Ptolemaic Period (711-30 BC), made of gold, mother of pearl, and yellow, green, and tan faience.

The next is Greco-Roman, and made of gold with the profile head of an emperor, dating to the 3rd-4th century AD.

Returning to Mexico, this next example is made of shell, and from Colima. 200 BC-AD 500.

The fifth necklace shown in Egyptian, dates to 664-525 BC, and is made of carnelian and faience.

The next example is likely Etruscan, dates to the Hellenistic period (325-50 BC), and made of gold.

Our final example is from ancient Bactria (located in modern Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan), made of agate, and dates to the Namazga V period, circa 2200-1800 BC.

All artefacts courtesy of & currently located at the LACMA, USA. Via their online collectionsM.71.73.318M.81.15050.22.18M.86.296.203M.91.200.250.22.8 & M.2000.183.1.